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Ebe Dancel on his new wedding collection: ‘I never imagined I would be releasing my music on vinyl’

Ebe Dancel talks about the inspiration behind ‘Habangbuhay’, his 4-track EP of original wedding music available on vinyl and streaming platforms.

Ebe Dancel on his new wedding collection: ‘I never imagined I would be releasing my music on vinyl’-Ann Manhit
BY
Ann Manhit
Instagram: @annmanhit

FRESH SCOOPS

10/21/2022 05:01 PM
Ebe Dancel on his new wedding collection: ‘I never imagined I would be releasing my music on vinyl’
Photo credit to @ebedancel Instagram

Singer-songwriter Ebe Dancel has been in and out of the music scene for quite a while. It was a few years ago when he announced that he would be taking a break from doing live performances.

“I was diagnosed a few years ago with depression and then I have an anxiety. So I guess someone like me ‘di talaga bagay sa masyadong crowded na places,” he admitted a few years ago.

At that point, he wasn’t even sure if he wanted to go back to music. 


READ: Why Ebe Dancel will take a hiatus from doing live performances

Yet music seems to be as much a part of Ebe as he is of it. Having been a singer-songwriter for the past two decades now, Ebe just feels thankful that he is still able to create. 

“I have been doing this for a long time. But releasing new songs still astounds me,” he said gratefully. “‘Kaya pa pala, kahit paunti-unti,’ I would tell myself.”

He credits his longevity in the industry to his supporters.

“It’s a privilege playing for you, after all these years,” said Ebe in his message to his fans. “You’re still here. I may seem oblivious or lost at times, but your support isn’t lost on me.”

“I appreciate every one of you,” he added.

READ: Ebe Dancel defends SB19 from critics: ‘We should welcome all forms of Filipino music’

Ebe’s music has been part of a lot of people’s personal playlists. They have been woven into many milestones, it seems, that his songs are often requested in weddings. 

“For some reason, married couples request my songs, even if most of them are sad: ‘Can you sing ‘Burnout’?’ Some use ‘Bawat Daan’ for the same-day edits,” observed Ebe, who has often been requested to do wedding gigs. 

With that being the case, he got an idea of actually writing music for weddings. 

“I thought, ‘Why don’t we put together a wedding soundtrack?’” he recalled.

“I often find myself getting taken by the love that fills the venue, especially at weddings,” Ebe shared. “How can you not feel the love bouncing left and right, up and down?” 

This was the emotion that Ebe captures in his EP. 

It starts with “Manatili”, a prayer for one’s love. “Tanging Kailan” is a wedding vow set to music. “Huling Unang Sayaw” is perfect for the couple’s dance, while “Habangbuhay” serves as an apt backdrop for same-day edit video coverages. 

His four-track EP, “Habangbuhay”, is a limited edition vinyl under Widescope Entertainment and Backspacer Records.

“I never imagined I would be releasing my music on vinyl,” said Ebe. “This is coming from a guy who used to record demos on tape recorders.”

“Habangbuhay” is also available as a limited edition release on 10-inch silver colored vinyl with a gatefold cover, as well as being on all major streaming platforms.

Ebe looked back at the collection, which he wrote while in lockdown during the pandemic. 

“It was hard not seeing my family and friends, so I channeled everything into these four songs,” Ebe shared. “Writing these songs was therapeutic.”

Rico Blanco, Ebe’s manager, was instrumental in making sure that no challenge would stand in the way of great music. 

“I don’t know how it would have turned out without Rico,” admitted Ebe. “He really encouraged me.”

One of the fantastic elements of the collection was that it was recorded with an actual orchestra. Both Rico and Ebe felt it was a key ingredient. 

“That was a real orchestra,” Ebe revealed. 

Everything was done via Zoom, such as the meeting and collaboration among the artists. 

“The [musicians] recorded their parts individually and sent them to Rico. Some of them had to record at 3 a.m. when no one else was awake … to avoid the noise of passing vehicles outside,” shared Ebe. “And then I had to record in a studio while Rico was on a monitor.”

Despite the difficulties, Ebe is proud of what they were able to accomplish. 

“Listening to everything is very fulfilling,” Ebe declared. “I would do it again in a heartbeat.”