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‘Train to Busan’ sequel director promises zombies in new film to enthrall viewers

Director Yeong Sang-ho promised to give viewers an enthralling experience with ‘Train to Busan 2: Peninsula’

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07/14/2020 02:42 PM
‘Train to Busan’ sequel director promises zombies in new film to enthrall viewers

Yeong Sang-ho, the director of the South Korean zombie thriller Train to Busan 2: Peninsula recently sat down for an interview to talk more about the film and what fans can expect from the highly-anticipated sequel. 

While the zombies in the upcoming film won’t be as threatening as those in the first one, Yeong Sang-ho promised that the film would give viewers an enthralling experience. 


“The zombies in ‘Peninsula’ aren’t quite as threatening. If I think about Jung Suk and the audience as having the same point of view, then they will feel a kind of ghostly tension when he returns to South Korea, since the zombies in ‘Train to Busan’ have their own story,” he said in an interview as translated by Korean entertainment site Soompi. 

The film, which follows four years since the events in Train to Busan, also talked more about the perspective of the characters — revealing why fear is more apparent towards people and not in the zombies. 

LOOK: A glimpse at ‘Train to Busan’ sequel

“The tension in the air evaporates after the first action scenes,” he shared. “This is because the perspective has to move from Jung Suk to the children who have lived there for four years. 

He added: “This is their daily life. In the case of [Lee Ye Won’s character] Yoo Jin, she has lived in this world since she grew up. So rather than seeing the zombies as threatening, she feels more threatened by the people living there.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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When asked why he chose the title Peninsula and not Train to Busan 2, he revealed that it’s because the events in the film did not take place in Busan. He likewise shared that the former was a more fitting title since South Korea is situated in a Peninsula, adding: “The concept of a peninsula is also ambiguous.”

He went on: “It’s not completely locked in, and there’s hope of an escape, so I think those ideas rubbed off on the main characters in the film.” 

Train to Busan, helmed by the same director, was released in 2016. It starred Gong Yoo, Jung Yu-mi, and Ma Dong-seok. 

Meanwhile, its release in the Philippines has yet to be announced. The film, which is an official selection to the 2020 Cannes Film Festival, stars Kang Dong-won and Lee Jung-hyun.